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Sancrox to Sarahs & King Creek


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 Hi everyone,


Well we had a full contingent for last Sunday’s paddle from Sancrox upriver to Sarahs & King Creek. It was a lovely morning weather wise & thanks to Di’s friends Keith & Liz Charles for allowing us to launch from their property. It is a beautiful spot just before the Rawdon Island Bridge ( coming from Port ) which they had kindly slashed for us. We welcomed Bruce & Lynne back to Sunday paddles & new members Grant, Steve & Kevin ( & Kevin’s daughter Natasha who was visiting).


Due to the numbers, we split into two groups with Stephen & Greg as leaders. At various times when I was taking pictures along the way, the kayaks looked like an Armada advancing up the river. As the tide was low, we got  excellent close ups of where the treacherous rocks are situated under the bridge & up near Narrow Gut. It was pleasant paddling up around the islands before linking up with the main river again, but we did not get far up Sarahs Creek  due to a fallen tree. A few of us paddled on to King Creek & had better luck but did not paddle all the way up. We crossed paths with the second group on the return trip & all made our way back down to Sancrox. Lunch was back at the launch point overlooking the delightful little ‘Monet’ lilypond.


Sancrox is approximately 12 kms west of Port Macquarie. Records from the Mid North Coast Library revealed that surveys of land around Port started in the 1830’s with a view towards opening up land for free settlers.
The survey here commenced in this area in 1831 & the starting point was the south west corner of the township named Hay ( named after Colonial Under-Secretary Robert William Hay ). It was known as Portion 1. There was a plan for a town but it never eventuated & for generations the area was referred to as Haytown or Haytown Reserve. By the end of the 1800’s there was a timber mill, a wharf & a punt across the river to Rawdon Island. The river at the time was impassable past this point for shipping due to a reef of rocks ( the remnants of which you see at low tide ). The area was, in the beginning, variously called St. Croix, St. Rocks & San Roch ( the latter meaning ‘saint on a sunken rock’) & was the site of a government farm run by a Frenchman. The name Sancrox survived all others, possibly as a misuse of the word San Roch, & was gazetted as such when timber mill workers cottages stood thereabouts. Eventually, the rocks were blasted through, the river dredged & from 1835 onwards ships were able to travel up as far as where Bain Bridge now spans the river.


Sarahs Creek flows from Cowarra Forest & is named after Sarah Allman ( wife of Captain Francis Allman, Commandant & Magistrate of Port Macquarie ) & her first child. Sarahs Creek Bridge was built in 1886 & is purportedly named after one Sarah Suters, wife of local farmer James Suters. 


Thanks to everyone who turned out to support this paddle & to Stephen & Greg for leading.


Hope everyone enjoyed their morning on the water

Cheers Caroline

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Kundabung: Pipers Creek


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Hi everyone,

You can’t help but fall in love ( all over again if you have paddled it before ) with Pipers Creek on a clear, sunny morning.

Nestled down amongst some magnificent trees, this perfect little paddle never disappoints & remains one of my personal favourites.

No matter the conditions, it is always picturesque & atmospheric & there is always a reflection ( or two or three or four ) which takes your breath away.
This gorgeous creek is very secluded & located at the end of a tree lined dirt road in the sleepy hamlet of Kundabung ( which translates to ‘Black Apple Tree’ ).

Unfortunately there were quite a few campers set up there when we arrived…all 23 of us plus kayaks…so it was a not as ‘secluded’ as usual!! However, once out on the water we had the creek all to ourselves.

To comply with social distancing we divided into three groups with one electing to paddle down to the Maria River & the other two paddling up north…the pretty end of this creek.

I could rave on about the beauty of the natural landscape along Pipers Creek, but I will let the photos speak for themselves. Instead, some history as it has a fascinating back story.

Believed to be names after one Captain Piper who was involved in survey work, it was on an exploratory & survey expedition in 1831 that Surveyor Ralfe discovered a stratum of limestone of a very superior quality about six miles from the head of navigation of Pipers Creek. The Police Magistrate at Port Macquarie provided 20 convicts to make a road from the Wilson River to construct a kiln for the burning of limestone. Cells were built for the convicts to sleep in at night. Some kilns still remain ( I have included two photos ). The limestone was burned up on site & conveyed to the loading wharf at Kundabung ( where we launch  ) on low wagons with wooden wheels hauled by a team of convicts. Lime from these kilns was used in the construction of many of the convict-built buildings in Port. Once the lime was loaded onto barges at the wharf, convicts were again used to row those boats all the way down Pipers Creek, into the Maria River, then into the Wilson & finally into the Hastings & into Port Macquarie!!! So if you think you do a few long paddles, spare a thought for these poor convicts!!!
Pipers Creek rises within the Ballengarra State Forest & flows east by south then south before reaching its confluence with the Maria River. It descends 177 m over its 32 km course.

The first European settlers in the Kundabung district were engaged in the timber industry. Logs were brought out of the bush on skids & then hauled by horses to the wharves on either side where Smiths Creek enters Pipers Creek. They were then transported via a log punt to Hibbards Mill in Port Macquarie. The early settlement was referred to as Smiths Creek; the name change came as the settlement got bigger.

After enjoying our paddle, which was cut short by a fallen tree which we could not negotiate as the tide was turning, we headed up to Kundabung where we had our picnic lunch in the grounds near the community hall. Sorry we could not enjoy our usual campfire, but the reserve was too crowded. Hopefully next time, once the ‘tourists’ move on.

Hope everyone enjoyed their paddle. Thanks Barry for organising the paddle.

Cheers
Caroline

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Balyngara & Stony Creek


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Hi everyone,

Further to Leon’s report on the Balyngara & Stony Creek paddle, here are some photos & extra information. Sorry I am running late!!

Twelve of us put in at the old ramp on the private property on Little Rawdon Island. This paddle is like a package deal as it comes with a pleasant Sunday drive through the green farming land of Rawdon Island with its sprawling properties, sleek cattle & peaceful vistas.

Rawdon Island was named after Francis Rawdon Hastings, the 1st Marquis of Hastings. The locale is made up of two islands…Rawdon & Little Rawdon Islands. The communities once boasted 27 dairy farms, two churches, a school, community hall & a footy team! The beautiful buildings of the old school are now a heritage function house. We are always grateful to the Galloways for allowing us to use their property to access the river up here as a starting point for our paddle.

After launching we paddled to the right under Little Rawdon Island bridge which always makes me think of Huckleberry Finn with people sitting fishing, their legs dangling over the edge of this narrow, one way bridge. We then veered right into Munns Channel with Quetta Island on our left. At the end we crossed over the main river & into Balyngara Creek, a wide creek flanked by farming land & lovely trees, before veering left into Stony Creek. It was perfect weather & calm water with nice reflections. We have not done this paddle for quite sometime & it was great to become reacquainted.

When a small group of us got back to the junction with Balyngara, four of us decided to paddle down to the end of this creek exploring. The remainder elected to wait for the others to catch up & then head back, & this is where Leon’s story starts.

We paddled right down Balyngara & into Loggy Creek but were pulled up in our tracks quick smart by a fallen tree. Back on Balyngara we paddled down to the Pembroke Rd. bridge. The spot where we used to have a cuppa now has a ‘pop up’ bush camp ( a bit ‘deliverance’ looking ) which I don’t think is quite legal as this area is Cairncross  State Forest. Our paddle back was uneventful & we enjoyed the peace & quiet & feeling of remoteness in this part of the river.
After making contact with the rest of the group by phone when we got back, we enjoyed a quiet lunch before helping the ‘wanderers’ back up with their kayaks.

Cheers
Caroline

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Korogoro Creek at Hat Head


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Our mid week paddle on Korogoro Creek at Hat Head had all the elements you could wish for:-

      • A relaxing, picturesque paddle on a sheltered creek
      • Great company
      • Sunny skies & calm water ( you could have walked across the ocean )
      • Picnic lunch overlooking the ocean
      • Whale & dolphin exhibitions
      • Bush walk with coastal views

Five of us enjoyed a lovely day out & it was great to catch up with John Rennes on the water again.

Hat Head & Korogoro Creek are in Dhanggati Country & there are three Aboriginal cultural sites in the immediate vicinity of the estuary.

Although considered part of the Macleay River catchment area, flood mitigation works carried out in the mid 1960’s & large floodgates separate the creek upstream from a large wetland known as ‘Swan Pool’ . The creek entrance is permanently open to the ocean & is drop dead beautiful with tree covered hills rising up  & some interesting rocky outcrops.The estuary has several endangered ecological communities & supports several threatened species including loggerhead turtles & Osprey.

As we set off from the ramp right at the ocean entrance, pelicans & sea gulls were resting happily on the exposed sandbanks. After we passed  under the pretty wooden footbridge we saw a huge grey kangaroo watching us from the bank . Following a leisurely paddle up to the floodgate wall area, John, Bruce, Jane, Bill, myself & ‘Billie’ ( on a training run ) enjoyed a picnic lunch up at The Gap overlooking the ocean. Here we were treated to whales breaching quite close in & a pod of surfing dolphins. There are several picturesque walking tracks up here in the Hat Head National park & Bruce, Jane & John undertook one after lunch.

All in all a great day. Great mid week as it is relatively quiet.

Cheers
Caroline

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IN THEIR 80TH YEAR AND STILL HAVING A GO!! 


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IN THEIR 80TH YEAR AND STILL HAVING A GO!!

Last Thursday, June 4, Bill V & Bill W marked their 8oth year on planet Earth by doing what they love best – a physical challenge which took the form of a biathlon of kayaking & cycling.

The duo completed successfully a 34 km paddle in 3 hours 12 minutes followed by a 60 kms bike ride which they completed in 2 hours 45 minutes; a total of 94 kms in 5 hours & 57 minutes.

Both men have not only survived but thrived after major surgeries, and maintain a great level of fitness by participating in regular, consistent exercise.
COVID-19 thwarted Bill V’s plans of a trip back to Malta to mark his landmark birthday while Bill W’s plans were put on hold as he recuperated from spinal surgery. So this was their chance to ‘celebrate’…together.

The two Bills departed Riverside (opposite Blackmans Point) at 7.05am. The air was cool, the sky overcast & the water choppy, but the tide was running in to assist & a tail wind gave about 50% support. As the conditions had been forecast to be a bit rough, Bill V elected to borrow Graham Keena’s Elliott ‘Extreme’ ( many thanks Graham) for a bit more stability. Bill W paddled his Time Traveller 575. There were no mishaps on the paddle which concluded, at 10.17am, at our launching point on Connection Creek on the Maria River Rd. After a quick cup of coffee & change of clothes & equipment, they headed off at 10.53am on their second leg….a cycle to South West Rocks. This took them along Maria River Rd. & down to Crescent Head, from there to Gladstone then alongside the Macleay River past Smithtown, Kinchela & Jerseyville to South West Rocks. They arrived safely at the surf club at 1.45pm.

After dismantling the bikes & a quick change, we enjoyed a good coffee & fish ‘n chips overlooking Horseshoe Bay.

In 1940, the year in which they were both born, Bill V in Malta & Bill W in Australia, the World was in a state of upheaval. World War II was underway & in the summer of that year France fell to Nazi Germany. On the home front, Australia was in danger of invasion from Japan. Fast forward 80 years & the world is once again in a state of upheaval as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Robert Menzies was Prime Minister & his counterpart in the UK was Winston Churchill. On a lighter note, ‘Old Rowley’ won the Melbourne Cup & Brisbane’s Story Bridge was opened.

The two Bills would like to thank Peter Levy & Greg Donaldson for their offers to help with turnarounds etc and Caroline who was road crew/sag wagon!!

Cheers
Caroline

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