port macquarie

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PMHCC Fundraisers Wrap-Up


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Hi everyone.
Well it’s been a busy month for fundraising and our members & supporters have done our club proud with both participation, support & generosity.
The final amount raised for our club’s fundraiser for CAMP QUALITY was $4811 which is a fantastic result. Thankyou again to everyone who paddled, supported or donated. Debra Moore from Camp Quality was thrilled with this result and passes on her thanks to everyone involved. 
Last Saturday, June 11 it was fantastic to see 19 of our club members paddling in support of the Port Macquarie Maroro Outrigger Canoe Club’s fundraiser for Riding for the Disabled, Wauchope. Two crews of six from this club supported our fundraiser so it was great to be able to repay them in this way. Our club donated $200 to this fundraiser and with 19 participants on the day & generous donations from other members, we contributed around $400+ to this worthwhile local cause.
It was a lovely, if chilly morning for this paddle. Six of us had a very early start, doing our car shuffle at dawn at Westport as the sun was just rising. We then joined the outrigger crew at Telegraph Point and paddled the 32 kms to Westport Park. Colin, Peter Levy, Bill V, Julie Howard & Bill & I elected to do this paddle. The Wilson & Maria Rivers were beautiful & calm with lovely reflections along the way. The water started to get choppy closer to the Dhoongang (Hastings) River. 
Greg led his group of seven paddlers (Rosemary & Ken, Maria, Ray, Barry & Pieternella) for a 10 kms paddle from Fernbank to Westport and Stephen led his group of six (Margaret, Sue, Alan, Mal & Faye) from McInherney. Thank you to those leaders and paddlers.
Unfortunately the promised BBQ back at Westport did not eventuate, but it was still good the enjoy the sunshine and catch up with each other. 
Cheers
Caroline 

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Herons Creek


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Hi everyone,
Eight of us enjoyed a perfect Autumn morning last Sunday on our paddle up Herons Creek. Queens Lake was calm & serene & there was just a light breeze, not like the Antarctic chill that has blasted up the river the last few days.
Herons Creek never disappoints. This wide creek which runs off the lake is wide and meanders gracefully, bordered by beautiful stands of tall timber and farming land.  There were some lovely reflections and sea eagles & osprey were engaged in fishing expeditions. Needless to say, everything is very green & lush after all the rain. The water is very discoloured at present but that did not detract from the surroundings & the atmosphere.
On our way home we deviated into Herons Creek village for a look around & found some very interesting information about the area’s early European history.
The area was home to the Turpentine Tramway and a very informative historical information board and sculpture tells the story.
In the late 1800’s & early 1900’s timber from the turpentine tree was highly sought after for wharf & jetty piles because it resisted marine borers better than other timbers. It was also largely termite resistant and difficult to ignite & therefore a valuable commodity. Large stands of this timber were known to exist around the headwaters of Cedar Creek and they became the target of what became known as the ‘Turpentine Tramway’. In 1895 one Justin McSweeney established the Federal Timber Company & built a sawmill at Homedale (near Kew). In order to avoid the delays caused when bullock teams were unable to work after heavy rain, he had built a 6km tramway in the heart of the turpentine country. The rails were hardwood spiked onto locally split wooden sleepers; logs were loaded onto small rail wagons & hauled to the mill by a horse team.  In 1897 the Australasian Timber Company bought the Kew mill but both it & the tramway were short lived as the company went into liquidation in 1898. The mill was sold & relocated to the Concord mill at Laurieton. The tramway ceased operation in the early 1900’s. This tramway was not without incident and on March 2 1899 a tragedy occurred when a 14 year old youth, who had been employed as a horse driver for only a week, was killed on the job. Rain had apparently made the rails slippery, and his trolley became unmanageable ( it was a practice that the horses were unharnessed & walked behind the trolleys on steep down hill sections & re harnessed on the flats). Instead of ‘abandoning ship’ as advised, he tried desperately to apply the trolley brakes harder but fell off and tragically was dragged under one of the wheels. He died from his injuries & is buried at Kendall cemetery.
Thanks, Peter, for leading this trip and to those members who came along for the paddle.
Caroline

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‘Paddle for Kids Facing Cancer’ Success


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A huge thank you to everyone, paddlers, volunteers, bystanders, donors & all who supported our ‘Paddle For Kids Facing Cancer’ fundraiser for Camp Quality on Sunday May 15. After a week of wet and windy conditions, the weather was perfect, the water conditions were fantastic and we raised $770 on the day. Along with donations already received, and those pledged, we will raise over $4000 which we are thrilled about.
Kayaks, outriggers, stand up paddleboards and sit on craft all participated in a calm and picturesque paddle around Pelican Island, enjoying the scenery of Woregore Nature Reserve.
Thank you again to everyone who contributed towards making this a successful fundraising event.
Regards
Caroline, Bill & the working group & the Port Macquarie Hastings Canoe Club Inc.  

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Come & Make A Splash For Kids Facing Cancer


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COME AND MAKE A SPLASH AND PADDLE FOR KIDS FACING CANCER

                                                         EVERY DAY TWO AUSTRALIAN FAMILIES

                                                         ARE GIVEN THE HEART-BREAKING NEWS

                                                         THAT THEIR CHILD HAS CANCER.

We are paddling for CAMP QUALITY because we want ALL families facing cancer to feel the support of the community around them. CAMP QUALITY gives kids facing cancer the chance to be kids again. CAMP QUALITYservices and programs are created specifically to support children aged up to 15 years who are dealing with their own cancer diagnosis or the diagnosis of someone they love, like their mum, dad, sister, brother or carer.

If you paddle a kayak, canoe, outrigger, SUP or any form of paddle craft, please come along and support the Port Macquarie Hastings Canoe Club’s:

PADDLE FOR KIDS FACING CANCER

Sunday May 15; 8.30am for 9am start. Distance paddled optional. Contact 0418 437 957 for info.Settlement Point Reserve (near big ferry)Entry/donation $10 per adult; $5 per child under 15 years                                  

BYO paddle craft; life jackets compulsory. Non paddlers welcome to make a donation; Click below

CLICK HERE TO DONATE TO FUNDRAISER

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD FLYER

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Upper Nambucca River


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 Hi everyone,
Last Sunday six of us escaped the road closures etc associated with the annual Ironman event in Port & headed north to Macksville for the day. We enjoyed a peaceful and relaxing paddle on the Upper Nambucca River in the traditional lands of the GUMBAYNGGIRR people. Our paddle was followed by fish ‘n chips & birthday cake sitting in the sunshine by the river in Macksville, watching the world drift by. It was Bill Vassallo’s birthday & our’ Billie’ wanted to help blow out the candles!! The paddle (approx.. 11 kms return) took us from Devil’s Elbow at Congarinni North upstream towards Bowraville. Grassy Park at Bowraville is the Nambucca River’s western tidal limit, but a huge fallen gum tree prevented us from getting to that point. Despite the flood discoloured water ( which is still everywhere) this is a lovely paddle; quiet with a feeling of remoteness. The river starts to narrow & is flanked by tall, towering trees with glimpses of grazing land (very lush at present) & watchful cattle relaxing in the shade of the trees. In some sections it becomes quite shallow with coarse river sand/gravel shoals.


According to information provided by the Nambucca Headland Museum, the name/term Devil’s Elbow appears to be a generic name used in many rivers to indicate a shallow area caused by gravel at a tight bend. A few kms upstream towards Bowraville there used to be a wharf called Devirs Wharf. It was only constant dredging that allowed the river past Devirs to be navigated by anything more than a drogher ( a basic cargo vessel; a blunt-ended, flat bottomed river boat with plenty of deck space & shallow draught allowing them access to otherwise inaccessible areas). Another ‘devil’s elbow’ apparently exists on Warrell Creek ( upstream from GUMMA) near where the weir was at the junction of Scott’s Head Rd. township & Gumma Rd. Downstream 4 kms from Devil’s Elbow is Wirrimbi Island which was at one time the site of an Aboriginal mission/reserve. It is a place of great cultural significance to the GUMBAYNGGIRR people of this region.


Since our last paddle up here the heavy rains have wreaked their havoc. Huge trees have been uprooted & lie where they fell. There has been considerable erosion to the river banks & more large trees are just hanging on, their root systems exposed. The land is saturated & at one point water was rushing off a paddock in a small waterfall. We could hear plenty of birdlife in the trees and the general feeling was one of calm. It was great that three of our group (Di, Stephen & Pieternella) had not done this paddle before thereby making it ‘new territory’ for them. 


Cheers
Caroline