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Come & Make A Splash For Kids Facing Cancer


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COME AND MAKE A SPLASH AND PADDLE FOR KIDS FACING CANCER

                                                         EVERY DAY TWO AUSTRALIAN FAMILIES

                                                         ARE GIVEN THE HEART-BREAKING NEWS

                                                         THAT THEIR CHILD HAS CANCER.

We are paddling for CAMP QUALITY because we want ALL families facing cancer to feel the support of the community around them. CAMP QUALITY gives kids facing cancer the chance to be kids again. CAMP QUALITYservices and programs are created specifically to support children aged up to 15 years who are dealing with their own cancer diagnosis or the diagnosis of someone they love, like their mum, dad, sister, brother or carer.

If you paddle a kayak, canoe, outrigger, SUP or any form of paddle craft, please come along and support the Port Macquarie Hastings Canoe Club’s:

PADDLE FOR KIDS FACING CANCER

Sunday May 15; 8.30am for 9am start. Distance paddled optional. Contact 0418 437 957 for info.Settlement Point Reserve (near big ferry)Entry/donation $10 per adult; $5 per child under 15 years                                  

BYO paddle craft; life jackets compulsory. Non paddlers welcome to make a donation; Click below

CLICK HERE TO DONATE TO FUNDRAISER

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD FLYER

Blog

Upper Nambucca River


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 Hi everyone,
Last Sunday six of us escaped the road closures etc associated with the annual Ironman event in Port & headed north to Macksville for the day. We enjoyed a peaceful and relaxing paddle on the Upper Nambucca River in the traditional lands of the GUMBAYNGGIRR people. Our paddle was followed by fish ‘n chips & birthday cake sitting in the sunshine by the river in Macksville, watching the world drift by. It was Bill Vassallo’s birthday & our’ Billie’ wanted to help blow out the candles!! The paddle (approx.. 11 kms return) took us from Devil’s Elbow at Congarinni North upstream towards Bowraville. Grassy Park at Bowraville is the Nambucca River’s western tidal limit, but a huge fallen gum tree prevented us from getting to that point. Despite the flood discoloured water ( which is still everywhere) this is a lovely paddle; quiet with a feeling of remoteness. The river starts to narrow & is flanked by tall, towering trees with glimpses of grazing land (very lush at present) & watchful cattle relaxing in the shade of the trees. In some sections it becomes quite shallow with coarse river sand/gravel shoals.


According to information provided by the Nambucca Headland Museum, the name/term Devil’s Elbow appears to be a generic name used in many rivers to indicate a shallow area caused by gravel at a tight bend. A few kms upstream towards Bowraville there used to be a wharf called Devirs Wharf. It was only constant dredging that allowed the river past Devirs to be navigated by anything more than a drogher ( a basic cargo vessel; a blunt-ended, flat bottomed river boat with plenty of deck space & shallow draught allowing them access to otherwise inaccessible areas). Another ‘devil’s elbow’ apparently exists on Warrell Creek ( upstream from GUMMA) near where the weir was at the junction of Scott’s Head Rd. township & Gumma Rd. Downstream 4 kms from Devil’s Elbow is Wirrimbi Island which was at one time the site of an Aboriginal mission/reserve. It is a place of great cultural significance to the GUMBAYNGGIRR people of this region.


Since our last paddle up here the heavy rains have wreaked their havoc. Huge trees have been uprooted & lie where they fell. There has been considerable erosion to the river banks & more large trees are just hanging on, their root systems exposed. The land is saturated & at one point water was rushing off a paddock in a small waterfall. We could hear plenty of birdlife in the trees and the general feeling was one of calm. It was great that three of our group (Di, Stephen & Pieternella) had not done this paddle before thereby making it ‘new territory’ for them. 


Cheers
Caroline

Blog

Cathie Hub Garden Stall


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 Hi everyone,
Thanks to an invite from Julie Howard, the club had a stall at the official opening of the Cathie Hub Garden held at Lake Cathie on Saturday morning. It was a real grass roots community event with plenty of local stalls of interest. The rain held off; the ground had firmed up & the sun came out; in other words the planets aligned for the day which was great as so much hard work had gone into organising it….not to mention all the work by volunteers to construct the community garden.


The star attraction of the day was the arrival of Costa Georgiadis, the host of the ABC’s popular show Gardening Australia. Costa is incredibly generous with his time, interest & enthusiasm; his ability to capture the interest & imagination of the children present was a delight to see as he led them, Peter Pan like, around the nearby parkland talking about the local trees and their importance to our environment. With his garden gnome hat & special ‘microclimate’ goggles, he had a captive audience.
Our stall attracted quite a few visitors and enquiries as well as a donation to our upcoming fundraiser for Camp Quality on May 15. Several people took flyers with them to put up at various locations. 


It was great to see Colin & Marian, Bill Vassallo, Stan & Barbara, Roger Barlow & of course Julie Howard ( who was one of the organisers & a volunteer at the community garden) & Patsy, who came close to stealing the .limelight from Costa in her koala costume, raising awareness of & funds for the Koala Hospital. Uncle Bill delivered his beautiful Welcome to Country and Leslie Williams and Mayor Peta Pinson also spoke, focusing on the importance of community and community projects.


Cheers
Caroline   

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Stingray Creek


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Hi everyone, finally the weather broke & held for our paddle on Sunday down Stingray Creek.
It was so good to see clear skies, some sun & to be out on the water.
Eleven of us enjoyed our morning gliding around the mangroves & down to the lake which was like glass.
Four elected to paddle across the lake the Limeburners Creek while the rest of us enjoyed the confines of the creek , little bays and stunning vistas across a very calm Queens Lake. You don’t often see it this tranquil. 
Lunch for most was back at the surf club while four of us elected to have a picnic overlooking the river which was very pleasant.
Thanks to those who joined us.
Caroline & Bill 

                             

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Deep Creek at Valla


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Hi everyone,
Eight of us enjoyed a beautiful paddle on Deep Creek at Valla last Sunday. As a club we have not paddled up here since 2012 when the late Brian Scholz introduced us to it. Deep Creek is a hidden gem with a stunning estuarine entrance flanked by healthy mangroves & other trees and graced by a lovely old timber footbridge which crosses over the estuary linking Valla Reserve (where we launched) with South Valla Beach. While doing my research I came across references to two other creeks in the vicinity – Oyster Creek & McGrath Creek – which we will have to check out in the future. Our paddle was approx. 14 kms return…& we did not reach the end of the creek. There are several little “sandy beaches” along the course of the creek which is wide and lined with soaring stands of timber. At one point there was a group of substantial pine trees, a couple leaning precariously across the creek. We spotted a couple of other launch sites along the way and when we checked out one on our way home we came across a group of local kayakers getting ready for a paddle!! This is just under Deep Creek Bridge. Launching here would shorten the paddle while enabling us to reach the end of the navigable water.


Deep Creek is tidal and fringed partly by forested, steeply descending banks, mangroves, fringed redgum woodland floodplain or mangrove mudflats. The red cedar in the area was the original attraction for Europeans and in 1863 the first whites to take up a selection of land were two brothers from Dublin, Nathanial and Andrew Buchanan. Their first home was constructed of slab and bark and stood on the banks of Deep Creek. The name Valla is said to have been chosen to match that of the British residence of 19th century diplomat Andrew Buchanan. A post office was opened at Deep Creek in 1905; it was renamed Valla in 1906.


Valla is the traditional country of the GUMBAINGIRR people. Valla Beach has many sites that are of high cultural significance & importance to these traditional custodians. One such is Pickett Hill (Nurguu Mirrai), a men’s only site which has been identified and approved as a protected area.
..”For thousands of years the Valla- Nambucca area has been part of the domain of the Gumbaingirr –  a vast Aboriginal group whose territory extended along the NSW Mid North Coast from the Clarence River in the north, to Macksville in the south and west as far as Glen Innes. Within this broad area covering around 6000 square kms, the Gumbaingirr were organised into a number of subgroups or clans, generally described as extended or interlinked family groups sharing a common dialect…neighbouring Aboriginal groups included the Bundjalung to the north; Nganyaywana to the west; and the Ngaka clans groups of the Dainggatti to the south”. (“Aboriginal & European Cultural Assessment Report, Valla Urban Growth Area, Valla NSW by Mary Dallas Consulting Archaeologists).


The same report states that from the early 1880’s a total of 16 Aboriginal Reserves were established…between the Macleay & Bellinger Rivers. In February 1894, 40 acres were gazetted for such purpose at Cow Creek near Valla in the Parish of Valley Valley. It was listed for use by an Aboriginal man, Fred Buchanan and his family. It was degazetted in 1952. The area is of high significance to the local Aboriginal community as Aboriginal people are known to have been buried there in the historic period the Reserve.


As we paddled there were lovely views through the trees and across farming land to conical shaped hills in the hinterland. Mt. England and its associated ridgelines lie to the immediate west and northwest & Gordons Know to the west ( & southwest). It was lovely to see kangaroos grazing quietly along the banks and the scenery was pleasant. There was a bit of a breeze blowing on the way up but it assisted us, along with a run out tide on the return trip. As we emerged back into the estuary there were lovely views through to the rocky outcrop on Valla Beach as well as the old footbridge. We enjoyed a picnic lunch in the shade overlooking the water at Valla Reserve.
Thanks to those who joined us; we hope it was worth the trip.


Cheers
Caroline & Bill